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I am no longer giving advice on Advicenators, and have requested that my account be deleted.

I am now giving advice on Askville as ->Peter

If you're looking for good advice here, I suggest you ask YoungGrandma. She's the best.

I don't expect to be checking in on this site again, so if you want to ask me something, see you on Askville!

Good luck!
Website: The Diary of An Invisble Man
E-mail: pmaranci@gmail.com
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Is it true that the only difference between Christianity and Judaism is that Christians believe that Jesus was the messiah and Jews don't believe the messiah has come yet? (link)
That's a major difference - perhaps THE major difference - but there are many other differences, too. For example, Jews practice circumcision as a religious ritual, and Christians don't. You may find it interesting to know that for Muslims circumcision is also a religious ritual, by the way.

Jews keep kosher, Christians don't.

Other differences include confession (for Catholics), the ritual of transubstantiation, most religious holidays, the Sabbath - for Jews Saturday is the day of rest, for most Christian sects it's Sunday - and I could go on and on. Christianity is derived from Judaism, but the relationship is complicated and generally not close.

The Torah of Judaism is basically the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. Jews do not recognize the New Testament, of course.

It's also important to note that there are many different sects of Christianity, and several different types of Judaism, too! These are all different from each other in different ways.

Wikipedia is a good place to start learning. Start with these links for more information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judaism_and_Christianity

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christianity_and_world_religions#Relationship_with_Judaism

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparative_religion


i'm wicca and i'm gonna have a baby and well i was wondering if it's wrong if i make my baby learn and follow through with the wicca relligon i really want her/him to belive in what i belive in and i think of it as like the christans and how they make them belive in the whole jesus christ bible stuff no offence to any people who belive in that relligon so is it wrong? plez help (link)
No, it's not wrong.

Throughout history, people have brought their children up in their own cultural and religious traditions. Why should you be any different?

Of course, it can be taken too far. If you overdo it, you could easily get a backlash. Human beings tend to resist when something is forced down their throats. So you'll have to manage a balancing act, of sorts; to raise your child in the wicca tradition and faith without being heavy-handed.

And it would be smart to take the cultural situation into account. Assuming that you're in the United States (which I suspect is the case, from your writing style), you have to recognize that you'll be bringing up your baby in a minority religion that most practitioners of the majority religion at best don't understand and at worst despise. That may lead to difficulties for your child. But of course it's no reason not to raise him or her in the faith that is the truth, as you see it.

Just be ready to cope with any potential difficulties, that's all.

It's also possible that your child may choose another faith when they get older, but that's a risk that every parent takes.

I'm in a similar situation, as an atheist; I'm doing my best to raise my son without religious belief. That in itself isn't difficult, but unfortunately well-meaning people keep foisting their own religious mythology on him. Which leads to endless questions and explanations.

Please note that ALL of what I've just written is based on my own understanding, and that I have never practiced wicca nor studied it much. I've emailed some pagan friends of mine and asked for their thoughts on the subject; if/when I hear from them, I'll pass their remarks along by editing my answer here.

FOLLOW-UP: A very knowledgeable pagan friend of mine tells me the following:

"Wicca is a specific neo-pagan religion, and has about a dozen or more sub-sects within it.

Generally about half of those sects are appropriate to teach a child in or have children involved in the faith directly, while the others it is inappropriate to have children in most rituals because of the cultural taboos of our society (things like use of communal alcohol, group nudity, etc.)

Without details beyond the use of the general term it's hard to say more."

If anyone is wondering, I got permission to quote that; my friend prefers to stay anonymous.

Good luck!


Do you believe in Palmistry? (link)
No. There's absolutely no evidence for it, any more than phrenology (the study of bumps on the head) or astrology. It's all nonsense.


I am looking for a religion but I want one thats right for me. Can someone tell me every religion out there and what its about? Also for religions that require you to go to church is it possible to just stay home and do what you would at a church and still have it not be a sin? (link)
Step one is for you to give some serious thought to WHY you're looking for a religion. Do you feel some lack inside? Some sort of need? If so, what is it? Once you know what you're looking for, you'll have a much better chance of finding it.

And please be careful. There are a lot of cults out there, and I've seen some people get into terrible situations. I know one girl who joined a cult, and later tried to saw off her tongue for saying "bad words". And she was one of the sweetest, nicest people I'd ever met! She ended up in a mental institution for years.

So please use your best judgement. There are some sophisticated groups out there whose sole purpose is to lure people in with friendship, peer pressure, and the opposite sex. Almost ANYONE can be sucked in by a set-up like that, no matter how smart and strong they are.

Don't ever let yourself get into a situation where you're isolated and dependent on others in the group to get home, or where others control what you can eat - weird though it may sound, one popular technique of brainwashing is to control your sugar and food intake.

Good luck!


hi everyone, i just decided to ask this question out of randomness, typical of me, anywayz is it true that some people call mormons devils, cuz they think its true? i'm a mormon, not that i'm offended, but i think thats hilarious that people could be so occupied making fun of other peoples religion, of course the world is full of weird people these dayz.
~Steph

ps. is anyone else mormon on this website, just out of curiosity (link)
I'm not a Latter-Day Saint, and never have been, but I've read a lot about the faith and am more knowledgeable than most Gentiles. I've had a couple of LDS friends.

I haven't heard the word "devil" applied in particular to LDS, but there are certainly some faiths - most commonly, certain fundamentalist Baptist sects - which consider LDS to be non-Christian and evil. They also feel that way about Catholics, and, well, just about everyone else, as far as I can tell. :D

My understanding is that the most intense anti-Mormon sentiment in the US is in the South, but that's not something I've witnessed first-hand; I've never been to the South.

I will say that my impression is that anti-LDS feelings run fairly deep in some segments of the US population, in part due to events such as the Mountain Meadows massacre, but more because of plain old-fashioned bigotry. As a result, I'm firmly convinced that LDS member and Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney is entirely deluded if he thinks he can win the 2008 Republican Presidential nomination, as he apparently believes. Too much of his potential base is prejudiced against him.


i was just wondering what a christians view was on cousins going out. is it a sin? and no, i'm not going out, or in love with my cousin! (link)
You may find this link useful:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblical_references_to_incest

In itself, I can find nothing in the Bible that says that dating is a sin. Fornication, of course, is a very different story.

Many of the legal restrictions against incest are based on the degree of consanguinity - that it, the degree of relation by blood. Under that reasoning, first-degree cousins by blood are forbidden to marry in most American states. On the other hand, most other nations of the world allow it. You can find more information about the genetics and legality of the issue here:

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/041001.html

Good luck!


My Bat Mitzvah is in October and I'm JUST starting to learn my haftroah. In my hebrew school, it is belived that women don't need to read from the torah. I can read as much hebrew as I please. I have like no time to learn about 8 lines of hebrew!! I'm getting very stressed out and I'm trying very hard to learn the hebrew but my nerves keep me from doing so!! Does anyone have any suggestions to calm me down and learn the part??!! (link)
The secret to memorization, of course, is repetition, repetition, repetition. :D

If all eight lines are too many at once, start with just one or two. Say them over and over, WAY past the point when you've got them down cold. Normally you'll eventually reach a point where you start making mistakes again. Keep repeating, and once you get past that point, you'll pretty much have burned them into your memory.

That should last for at least five years.

Print out a copy and have it with you at all times. In the bathroom, on the bus, wherever and whenever you have a spare second or two, PRACTICE!

As for relaxation techniques...here are a few links. I can testify to the effectiveness of three deep, slow, cleansing breaths. That ALONE will calm you noticably. After that, try tensing and then relaxing specific areas, moving upward from your feet all the way to your scalp. If you practice that every night in bed (or more often), you'll have it down to a habit in a month.

http://wso.williams.edu/orgs/peerh/stress/relax.html

http://www.healthy.net/asp/templates/article.asp?PageType=article&ID=1205

http://www.sju.edu/counseling/pages/quick_relax.html

Good luck!


How do you know if you believe in God or if you just think you do? (link)
Belief in God is faith. Which means that it's impossible for anyone to answer that question for you: it's something that *only you* can answer for yourself.

And maybe you can't. It may take a lifetime of prayer, of thought, of searching, and even then, at the end, you may still not be sure if you truly have faith, or not.

Of course, if there's an afterlife, you may find out *then*.

For now, all you can do is search your heart and see how you feel.

In the meantime, I would suggest that you not let this issue destroy your life. Think, pray, search in whatever way feels right to you. Talk to your spiritual counselor, or if you don't have one, you might want to talk to several different counselors. Live the best life that you can, a life that you can be proud of.

I think, if you do, that in the end you will be satisfied.


How can you make yourself believe? Can you write "I Believe In God" a thousand times on a sheet of paper? Because I've been having trouble believing lately. (link)
Faith comes from within. It's an emotional thing. You can't MAKE yourself believe, no matter what you do, any more than you can *make* yourself fall in love with a particular person. You either do, or you don't. But it's not something you can control.

If this issue is really troubling you, you should talk to your spiritual counsellor - your minister, rabbi, priest, Imam, or whatever is appropriate for your particular faith.

If you find that you just can't believe, try not to torture yourself over it. Many other people have been there. I have. It's a hard thing to go through, but it IS survivable.

Good luck!


hey...well within the last year i have become christian. but lately i have been having my doubts. i have depression, and have had it for about 2 years now. i pray so much but i dont seem to be making any progress to becoming happier. i dont understand why my prayers arent getting answered. (link)
As always, I'll be up front about this and begin by saying that I am an atheist, although I'm fairly well-read in the Bible.

My understanding (and your own particular sect may differ on this point) is that God does not answer all prayers for a number of reasons. Here are some:

1. Because we don't know everything. Maybe the depression was sent to test you. They say that God moves in mysterious ways, after all. Perhaps, years down the road, after you have worked through and conquered your depression with the help of doctors and medication, you will end up a better person, stronger in your faith, because of the trial that you have gone through.

2. Because of the doctrine of free will. If human beings did not have some freedom of action - the same freedom which allowed the Original Sin - then our choices would be meaningless. We could not truly choose to come to God, to accept salvation, because we wouldn't HAVE a choice. Our purpose as created beings would be nullified if we weren't able to make our own decisions; we would be, to quote Anthony Burgess, like a "clockwork orange", not real creatures at all. Our sin, and redemption, would be meaningless, and there would have been no point to Christ's crucifixion and resurrection at all.

The same doctrine could apply to the answering of prayers. If God answered all prayers, who would question his existence? How could we freely chose between good and evil?

3. It's also possible that God will answer your prayers via other human beings - that is, through medical treatment and therapy from mental-health specialists! I know of no doctrine that says that God is limited to acting through miraculous means only. Just because medical treatment has visible human causes doesn't mean that it doesn't ultimately come from God.

You should talk to your pastor or spiritual leader for answers about this subject, of course. They're far more qualified to answer than I am.

From a strictly secular viewpoint, let me say that depression is NOT a character defect, nor the result of sin. It is a documented neurochemical ILLNESS, as real as a broken leg or heart attack. If you broke your leg, would you pray to God to heal it? Perhaps you would, and ultimately you might feel that the cure came from Him, but unless you are a Christian Scientist or belong to some sect with similar beliefs, I'd bet that you'd also go to a hospital to have your leg x-rayed, the bone set, and a cast put on. And you wouldn't consider it a spiritual failure to go to a doctor.

Just because an imbalance of the chemicals in your brain isn't as visible as a broken leg is no reason not to seek medical treatment. If anything, relying on prayer only might be considered a sort of spiritual hubris - testing God, to force Him do what you could do for yourself, with human help.

But God is not a butler or a slave.

It would be like jumping off a cliff to see if God would catch you. I know of no doctrine that says that this is acceptable. Since effective treatment for depression is available from human sources - and it IS available, and effective - you should take it.

It may take time, and patience. But in the end you CAN have your life back. So pray, if you want, but also talk to your doctor. He or she will probably refer you to a specialist for an evaluation.

There's an old saying: "God helps those who help themselves". Please take that first step.


What is your opinion on religion? I've heard about the theory of evolution and it makes a lot of sense.
And right now the theory of god and heaven doesn't seem real. There's no proof.
Can any of you give me your point of view? I want details b/c i'm really troubled with this.
plz help
thanks! (link)
I try to avoid religious debate, because it tends to be fruitless and frustrating. By its nature, religion really can't be debated; debate presumes logic, and religion is pure emotion, albeit often cloaked in pseudo-logic.

I did get kind of dragged into the issue once here, though. Here's a link to the question and my response:

http://www.advicenators.com/qview.php?q=363056

In short, I'm an atheist. I was once a Christian, but came to the conclusion that the supernatural simply made no sense to me...and I saw no reason other than special pleading to place the Christian God and mythos into a separate category from all other supernatural beliefs, from Santa Claus to Zoroastrianism.

That's not fashionable to say, of course, and it certainly isn't the sort of thing that gets you wide social acceptance - at least, not in the modern US. But as a rationalist, I have no other option. I have to uphold what I believe is the truth, or I'd have no self-respect.


This is not a question persay, feel free to delete it. You just responded to my question and I'd like to thank you and say simply that I am not a believer, although I can understand why you made the assumption. I simply find atheism unconvincing. (and am dating an atheist and have a sudden intrest in it) I just can't seem to make it follow rationally that because there is a lack of solid quanitifiable evidence (as in your cream pie around mars) there is nonexistance, disbelif sure, but not nonexistance. So I was looking for evidence of nonexistance of God, not disprof, or explainations of disbelif of specific religions.

I hope I've clarafied myself a bit.
Thank you agian (and I'm sorry I did rate). I have seen some of your pervious run ins with believers and I was glad to get you specifically to answer my question.

Razhie (link)
Forgive me, Razhie, but it's awfully late; I should have been asleep an hour ago. So this won't be as long as I would like it to be.

Of course I'd be happy to talk in more detail later.

The problem is that except in special cases such as mathematics, it's impossible to prove a negative.

There are literally an *infinite* number of possibilities for the supernatural. God, or gods, could be anywhere. Every imaginable possibility COULD exist. But we don't worry about it. We don't spend a SECOND trying to disprove those myriad possibilities. Because ultimately those infinite possibilities add up to nothing.

Christians seem to feel that we atheists need to make a special case to somehow justify our lack of belief in their God. But why is the Christian God a special case? The only reasons that I can see are cultural and political.

No, I can't prove that there's no God. I wouldn't even bother. But the whole issue is simply meaningless to me now. I personally wouldn't say "There is no God", any more than "There is no Orbiting Banana Cream Pie" - because the whole IDEA seems silly and pointless to me.

I will say, though, that if the Christian God DID exist, I'd find His morality extremely questionable (examples: killing babies and endorsing slavery). And I probably don't need to point out all the weird contraditions that you can find in the Bible.

About rating: it's okay. I just didn't want to get another spiteful downrating. One of the believers I answered gave me a 3 for what I knew was the best answer s/he'd gotten, and the hypocrisy was simply galling. Fortunately a moderator felt the same way, and changed things. :D

I don't care about ratings much. What I treasure are comments and feedback from people who tell me that I really helped them.

And now, time for me to sleep. Write again any time, here or at my email address!


Why do atheists believe there is no God? I hear a lot of arguments against organized religion but I don’t hear many actual ‘reasons’ that there is not or cannot possibly be a God? So what are thier reasons? (link)
Okay, I'm going to be up-front about this. You're going to get the most honest answer that I can give you. So I'm going to ask you in advance not to rate this answer. Because, frankly, I've already been disappointed by the revenge-rating activity of two of the three Christians I've responded to on this site.

Please don't disillusion me further. If you want to discuss any of this, my inbox and email are always open.

That said:

You haven't put the question in the correct form.

It's not a matter of an affirmation, of a positive belief, but rather of a LACK of belief.

I'll try to explain. For the sake of this explanation, I'll assume that you're a Christian, if you don't mind.

Do you believe in the divinity of Thor, the Thunderer? In Odin, the One-Eyed Allfather? Do you believe in Krishna, Shiva, Allah, Zoroaster, or Mithras? How about Great Cthulhu and Nyarlathotep?

You don't? What are your reasons for denying their godhead, then? How do you justify casually denying the possibility of their existence?

I could have picked more common examples, of course - ones that you may have believed in at some time, such as Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, E.T., etc. But the point is the same.

You don't feel any need to prove or justify your lack of faith or belief in all those gods. You most likely consider them false gods. Likewise, I doubt you've spent much time agonizing over your failure to keep faith with Kris Kringle - despite the fact that you had solid EVIDENCE of his existence for many years, in the form of the toys he brought to you as a child.

Atheists simply believe in one less god than you do. And their reasons for not believing in him are exactly the same as your reasons for not believing in Thor, the Hammerer: they don't see any reason to take it seriously. They may have studied comparative religion, and noticed that many religions share common themes and "proof" - so why should one ancient collection of stories (the Bible) be held valid over another (the Torah, the Koran, the Vedas, etc.)?

They may have studied psychology, and history, and noticed that religion and belief in the supernatural are a natural response of people to the unknown - and that when you go back more than a thousand years, LOTS of things were unknown. Our ancestors were primitive in many ways. When they heard the thunder, they couldn't explain it. Until the local witch doctor or shaman told them that it was his big magical friend in the sky throwing his giant hammer around.

Or they may have just noticed the complete lack of evidence for the supernatural in the world we live in and decide that common sense tells them that the chance of a god really existing is too small to worry about.

Example: you have no way of knowing that there isn't an all-knowing banana cream pie floating in orbit around Mars. It's possible, right? You don't know everything that's in orbit around Mars, so how can you deny the possibility of the existence of the Lord God Banana Pie?

Yet somehow, I don't think you've ever spent a moment worrying about your lack of faith in space-going pastry. :D

You might argue that there is evidence for the existence of God (as opposed to Banana Pie), in the form of the Bible. Atheists don't agree; they find the Bible no more convincing than any other ancient religious work. They may appreciate the Bible as poetry and metaphor (I do), but they DON'T accept it as proof of the supernatural.

The thing is, though, those are all logical reasons. And I don't think you really WANT logical reasons. You don't believe in God because of *logic*, after all.

You believe in Him because of faith and emotion.

That faith may have come from a lifetime of habit. It may have come via training from your parents. It may come from cultural patterning. It's probably a combination of all of those things.

Or you may have had a profound emotional experience, a religious revelation. That happens to followers of many faiths. You may have spoken to God, or heard His voice, or felt Him manifest in your heart.

But others haven't shared that experience. And they have no reason to pretend that they've gone through it. To profess a belief when you DON'T believe is the height of hypocrisy. I would imagine, if there were a God, that he would prefer a disbeliever who was honest about their disbelief over someone who falsely claimed a belief that they did not truly feel.

I hope that answered your question. If you were looking for an argument, you won't find one from me. I realized long ago - after my own struggle with and past religion - that there's no way to win a religious argument. Because the essence of faith is not logic and reason, but rather emotion.

I could talk until I was blue in the face. I could give you a million reasons not to believe. None of it would matter, as long as you had faith.

And in truth, I don't WANT to take your faith away. I wouldn't TRY. Why should I? If it makes you happy, if it gives you comfort, why on earth would I want to take that away from you?

I wouldn't. And I don't.

I wish you happiness and fulfillment in your faith. Good luck.


Evangelism shakes up society: Yep, they nailed Jesus to a cross. Thank you Jesus for being the perfect example!

The Rich: Yes. Jesus said, “How hard it is for the rich to enter the kingdom of God.” Those riches that these people cling too will all fade away eventually and if Jesus wasn’t the center of their life, these people will perish with their riches.

Dieing for God: I can give you testimony upon testimony of how I KNOW (not think I know, but actually know) God’s will for my life and when I die, whether by natural means or killed because of my faith, I will be with Him forever. Only someone who has a relationship with God through His Son Jesus can understand this. You obvious have read the scripture, but your knowledge without relationship will not help you at all in the end.

Killing for God: There is a huge difference between dieing for ones faith in Jesus and killing like the terrorists do. The terrorists are fighting a spiritual battle with natural means. Their God is false and a lie. Satan is the father of lies.

Laws of the land: God's Word says to protect the innocent, that He knew us before we were born, and murder is a sin. Although the law of the land makes abortion legal, God’s law surpasses that and Christians have a moral responsibility to make that known.

There is a lot to merit living ones life before others and being an example before them; to lead them to the Word. Jesus’ life is my example and the scripture says to follow His example. Jesus did not sit back and just live His life. He confronted. He healed. He spoke-up. He taught. And He died. Why? Because He loves us.
(link)
I've started this several times, in several different ways, only to erase what I've written and start over. The problem is, there isn't really a common ground for us to have a discussion on this topic.

I gave you the best answer I could, being clear that I am not a Christian, in part because I like to answer questions and also because I've studied the Bible and the history of religions - most particularly Christianity - quite a bit.

That said, I tried to make my answer as accurate and honest as I could. But please note that since I am not a Christian, I was giving you an outsider's viewpoint: my guess as to why so many Christians aren't particularly interested in actively proselytizing. I have a background in sociology and anthropology, among other things, and it's from that perspective that I was primarily answering.

When you get down to it, the truth is that faith is a matter of personal religious revelation - the product of an emotional experience. You KNOW God's will for your life, because you've had that personal religious experience. I, and many others, have not. So while you may be sure that He is the only way, there are others who just as firmly believe that their own way is true.

I can assure you that there are Jews, and Hindus, and Moslems, and Wiccans, and members of other faiths who are just as certain that they "know" the truth as you are. Some have died to prove their faith.

Yes, as I said, you don't believe that their "gods" are real. But they don't agree. They "know" that YOUR God is a false one. They've seen and spoken with Allah, or Shiva, or whoever, and believe with absolute faith.

And here I've run into trouble again. I might as well be writing to you in Swahili, because no matter what I say, I know that you won't believe me. You KNOW that your sect of Christianity is the only way, and that's that.

Nor am I going to try to persuade you otherwise! For one thing, I couldn't possibly succeed. For another, I don't WANT to change your mind. You are free to believe as you wish. You are even free to try to persuade others to believe as you do, as long as you respect their basic rights as citizens.

When you talk about dying for God, though, I will admit: I worry. History is filled with examples of terrible atrocities committed in the name of God - and even of Jesus - by people who KNEW the "truth".

But again, I know that I'm not going to convince you of that. And I don't really want to. So all I can do is wish you well, and ask you to consider that others who differ with your beliefs deserve the right to follow their own consciences without persecution.

Faith cannot be forced.


why are christians so afraid to share there faith! im a christian and im not afraid at all. why cant the "christians" who wont die for God stop calling themselves christians! (link)
There are many different sects of Christianity, and not all agree with each other on how to interpret different passages in the Bible.

As a result, they don't all share the same understanding of how to proselytize.

In general, older, more established "mainstream" Christian sects tend to become more "respectable". Evangelizing, by its very nature, shakes society up; it rocks the boat. Sects which have become part of the social elite naturally resist disrupting the fabric of society.

It's like this. If a church has a lot of rich, socially-respected members, they don't want things to change too much. Change is risky when you have a lot; it's more likely that you could lose the good things that you have.

A poor church, on the other hand, has less to lose and more to gain by spreading the word and gaining more members.

Historically, there have been many churches that wouldn't WANT to convert a bunch of poor people - they wouldn't want those people to come to their church.

I should point out that this isn't true only of Christian churches; it's common for all sorts of religions, and for clubs and organizations, too.

Now, as for dying for God: that worries me. Because the truth is, people don't die for God; they die for what THEY THINK God wants. According to Christian theology (and in fairness I should note that I'm not a Christian, although I've read the Bible many times), human beings are imperfect. We're all flawed with the taint of Original Sin, and Christ was the only perfect human being. So when we are willing to die (or kill) for God, there's a very good chance that we will be WRONG.

The terrorists on 9/11 believed that they were dying for God. You, I'm sure, believe that they were wrong; that their god was a false one. You may be right. I'm not a Moslem, either, so I have no opinion on that.

The point is that human beings are flawed, and make mistakes; that's very clear, if you read the Bible. And your life is a gift from God. To sacrifice that life without being sure that you're doing what God wants you to do with it is wrong. Isn't it? And you can't really be sure.

The Bible is very large, and even people who've studied it all their lives can't always agree on what it all means. So I'd suggest studying it for yourself, and thinking (and praying) very hard about it.

You can certainly share the good word. But since you're living in a tolerant, pluralistic society, part of your resposibility as a member of that society is to allow others the right not to believe as you do. You cannot FORCE others to believe; it simply doesn't work.

And remember, Jesus commanded his followers to respect the laws of the land:

And Jesus answering said unto them, Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's. (Mark 12:17)

I believe that the most effective evangelizing technique is to lead others to the Word by your own example, for the most part. Live the best life that you can, in service to others and to God, and those that witness your dedication will be inspired to follow your path.


hey.. umm in 2003 i was a cheerleader.. and i was a base . the one who holds the flyer.. and well 2004 .. i didnt know where to sign up. And it was a exciting year.. they threw the flyers. and stuff... and they went to nantucket for a huge competion. Well im doing cheerleading this year.. and i dont know if im strong enough to be a base. I love being a base..
I duno why i need advice..
But any tips to get stronger.?

I RATE HIGH!! ;) (link)
I'm not sure why this is in Spirituality, but what the heck.

The best way to increase your strength, is to increase your overall health. You've probably heard it before, but that means eating plenty of fruits and vegetables and eating a well-balanced diet. You should also make sure to stay well-hydrated by drinking plenty of water.

Here's a quick link to information on the new Food Pyramid for teens: http://kidshealth.org/teen/food_fitness/nutrition/pyramid.html

Remember, you don't just want to strengthen your muscles - if you're going to be a base, it's vital that you make sure your bones are as strong as possible. That means getting plenty of calcium from milk and dairy products, as well as leafy green vegetables.

The last element is exercise, of course. You can alternate cardiovascular exercises such as walking, running, or cross-ramp training with weight machines. Or if you don't belong to a club, get a set of hand weights and go for speed-walks while lifting the weights. That's not the full-body strengthening you're looking for, but it will certainly help.

And because you need to keep your mind in shape just as much as your body, I'd recommend reading at least one book a month just for fun, if you aren't already.

Good luck!


Why should people become Christains? Like what iss the purpose in it? (link)
You should become a Christian if you believe in the divinity of Jesus Christ and the truth of his teachings.

If you don't believe in those things, then don't become a Christian. It's really very simple.

There are, of course, other reasons. People join churches to get in with an in-crowd, to make friends, to get laid, or because everybody else is doing it.

I think many, maybe MOST Christians are Christians because that's how their parents raised them and they never question it - the same way that most Buddhists were raised by Buddhist parents, most Hindus were raised by Hindu parents, etc.. Straying from one's family and cultural religion is awfully rare, although I suspect that it's more common in the pluralistic and culturally-diverse United States than in most other countries. And even so, most Americans stay with some form of Christianity.

Please note, however, that since I am not a Christian I can't answer your question in terms of the personal religious feelings and faith that a Christian would.

So basically, search your heart. If it tells you that Christianity is for you, go for it. If you feel confusion, but some sort of spiritual need, perhaps you should investigate many different religions and philosophies. And if you feel fine, don't worry about it. :D


i want to make a shirt for my best friend, because her birthday is comin up... shes very religious and i want to put some sort of quote on it...so does anybody kno any short bible verses, or religious quotes?? thanks for your help!! (link)
"For you shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free" is an old favorite of mine; you can take that with a grain of salt if you wish, since I'm an atheist.

If you want something REALLY short, "John 3:16" has historically been THE most popular message used by Christians for purposes of evangelizing. It refers to this verse (and I'm quoting from memory, so I may be slightly off):

"For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, so that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life."

Many consider that the core message of Christianity.




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